Auburn Covid-19

Massachusetts COVID-19 Vaccination Information

https://www.mass.gov/info-details/massachusetts-covid-19-vaccination-phases

Phase 1 & 2 Eligibility Status

  • All phase 1 priority groups ELIGIBLE
  • Individuals age 75+ ELIGIBLE
  • Individuals 65+ and individuals with 2+ certain medical conditions ELIGIBLE
  • K-12 educators, K-12 school staff, and child care workers ELIGIBLE
  • Individuals age 60+ and workers in certain sectors (including transit, grocery, utility, food and agriculture, sanitation, public works, and public health workers) ELIGIBLE
  • Individuals age 55+ and individuals with 1 certain medical condition ELIGIBLE
  • Individuals age 16+ Eligible April 19

Find a vaccine appointment, if you're eligible

  • Preregister at VaccineSignUp.mass.gov to be notifies when it's your turn to schedule an appointment at one of 7 mass vaccination locations.
  • Use VaxFinder.mass.gov to search for appointments at pharmacies, health care providers, and other community locations.
Vaccine Phases Graphic March 22, 2021

Comunity Messages from the Town of Auburn

Auburn's Latest Updates

Positive Cases: 1518

Reported Deaths: 36

Updated: 04/08/2021

Massachusetts COVID-19 Response Reporting and Interactive Data Dashboard

TOWN HALL OPEN FOR LIMITED APPOINTMENTS ONLY

  • 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM Monday
  • 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Wednesday
  • 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM Friday

THE DRIVE-THROUGH KIOSK HOURS

  • Monday through Thursday 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM

  • Friday 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM.
Wear a mask, Stay 6 feet apart, Avoid crowds

HOW DOES COVID-19 SPREAD?

COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly through close contact from person to person, including between people who are physically near each other (within about 6 feet). People who are infected but do not show symptoms can also spread the virus to others. Cases of reinfection with COVID-19  have been reported but are rare. We are still learning about how the virus spreads and the severity of illness it causes. 

COVID-19 MOST COMMONLY SPREADS DURING CLOSE CONTACT

  • People who are physically near (within 6 feet) a person with COVID-19 or have direct contact with that person are at greatest risk of infection.
  • When people with COVID-19 cough, sneeze, sing, talk, or breathe they produce respiratory droplets. These droplets can range in size from larger droplets (some of which are visible) to smaller droplets. Small droplets can also form particles when they dry very quickly in the airstream.
  • Infections occur mainly through exposure to respiratory droplets when a person is in close contact with someone who has COVID-19.
  • Respiratory droplets cause infection when they are inhaled or deposited on mucous membranes, such as those that line the inside of the nose and mouth.
  • As the respiratory droplets travel further from the person with COVID-19, the concentration of these droplets decreases. Larger droplets fall out of the air due to gravity. Smaller droplets and particles spread apart in the air.
  • With passing time, the amount of infectious virus in respiratory droplets also decreases.

COVID-19 CAN SOMETIMES BE SPREAD BY AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION

  • Some infections can be spread by exposure to virus in small droplets and particles that can linger in the air for minutes to hours. These viruses may be able to infect people who are further than 6 feet away from the person who is infected or after that person has left the space.
  • This kind of spread is referred to as airborne transmission and is an important way that infections like tuberculosis, measles, and chicken pox are spread.
  • There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than 6 feet away. These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising.
  • Under these circumstances, scientists believe that the amount of infectious smaller droplet and particles produced by the people with COVID-19 became concentrated enough to spread the virus to other people. The people who were infected were in the same space during the same time or shortly after the person with COVID-19 had left.
  • Available data indicate that it is much more common for the virus that causes COVID-19 to spread through close contact with a person who has COVID-19 than through airborne transmission.

COVID-19 SPREADS LESS COMMONLY THROUGH CONTACT WITH CONTAMINATED SURFACES

  • Respiratory droplets can also land on surfaces and objects. It is possible that a person could get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes.
  • Spread from touching surfaces is not thought to be a common way that COVID-19 spreads

COVID-19 RARELY SPREADS BETWEEN PEOPLE AND ANIMALS

  • It appears that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread from people to animals in some situations. CDC is aware of a small number of pets worldwide, including cats and dogs, reported to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after close contact with people with COVID-19. Learn what you should do if you have pets.
  • At this time, the risk of COVID-19 spreading from animals to people is considered to be low. Learn about COVID-19 and pets and other animals.

Information taken from:https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-covid-spreads.html

Watch for symptoms

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update their list as they learn more about COVID-19.

When to seek emergency medical attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face
  • This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Information taken from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html